Catholic Community Commentary

Posts tagged “support

Komen…What’s the Controversy?

            Recently Bishop Blair wrote a letter concerning fund-raising for the Susan G. Komen Foundation. His clear statement addressed the problem of cancer research and the use of embryonic stem cells. While Susan G. Komen ofNorthwest Ohiodoes not directly fund cancer research, it does send 25% of the collected donations to the parent company which does offer grants for cancer research.

          Bishop Blair is responsible for imparting the teaching of the Catholic Faith to the people ofNorthwest Ohio. It is a responsibility that he neither takes lightly nor can choose to ignore. In that capacity, the Bishop addressed the sanctity of human life from conception to natural death, one of those teachings. Since some cancer research institutions use unwanted embryos from fertility centers for their research, there is potential that these small human lives are not being respected.

          In addition to support of life in the womb, Bishop Blair also offered support for those struggling with cancer when he suggested directing donations to the Mercy Cancer Centers. The Northwest Ohio Susan G. Komen Foundation had been sending money to the Mercy Cancer Centers as part of their outreach so the Bishop’s suggestion does not diminish this work.

          It is very important for us to realize that any past fund-raising we may have done for the Susan G. Komen Foundation, done in good faith, was not wrong. However, knowing what we do now, it is important to direct our donations to life-affirming organizations.

          Finally, since embryonic stem cells have been used in research, they have never been proven to assist with any medical condition. In fact, they react much like cancer cells. On the other hand, adult stem cells, which harm no human being, have been proven to help with leukemia, Parkinson’s disease, spinal cord injury, juvenile diabetes, lupus, multiple sclerosis, sickle-cell anemia, heart damage, corneal damage, and dozens of other conditions. Just from a scientific perspective, it does not make sense to direct funds to research that has proven itself ineffective and away from such a viable alternative.

          I would hope, though, that we would approach this issue through the eyes of faith. I pray that as Catholics we can see that when we treat any human being, no matter how small or vulnerable, as less than dignified, we tear at the very fabric of our own humanity, our connection to the Creator.

Jan Kahle, Respect Life Coordinator for the Diocese of Toledo


Is There a Thomas in the House?

     Hi, all you bloggers.    I have to say that the staff here is crazy and I love it.  New ideas are entertained and sometimes they entertain us.  One of the latest ideas was to promote our CYO basketball program and get as many people at the game as possible.  At a tournament game hosted at our local gym, we would have prizes for anyone who could make a half court shot.  To advertise, a short video of me making a half court shot would be featured.  By the hand of God, I made the shot on the second attempt and the video project was completed.  Now comes the interesting part of the project…  
     I went to the grade school to show off the video.  The kids were congratulatory of my basketball skills and full of wide-eyed hopes that they could win a prize at the game.  There were no doubts that such a shot could come from my hand.    Next, I next went to the high school building.  When they viewed the video, they thought it was a hoax.  Somehow the youtube promo was spliced and not real.  I had a difficult time convincing the students that it was real.  I’m not really sure they ever believed me.   And then it was time to show the video to the adults.  They, too, were skeptical of my half court shot, although they were not as hard to convince as the teenagers.
     This project has made me wonder about our society.  Have we been so tricked by so many that belief comes hard?  Are we in a society of Thomases?  Do people believe me when I preach?  Can people tell the difference between truth and fiction? 
      Who and what we believe comes into question.  What is truth for you?  That is a question that we will encounter during the Lenten season.    Have a great day.  I mean it.   That’s the truth.

Fr. Mark


The Hand of God and Snow Angels

Hi to you bloggers,
     I’ve been away for a while due to vacation and Christmas activities.  It is good to be back.  Today’s topic is seeing the hand of God. 
     Recently, our parish put together something unusual and touching.  We decided to put together a project called “Andy’s Angels in the Outfield.”  An invitation was put out to get participants to line up on a lighted baseball field and to fall backwards into the snow (in zero degree weather) to make snow angels for a recently departed angel named Andy.  Our expectations of a few angels showing up were soon overwhelmed as hundreds of angels showed up for the fundraising event to help the family with expenses due to Andy’s illness.  Although we raised a nice financial nest egg, we raised the spirits of the family and community. 
     To say that we will never forget, and that love will never die, is part of our faith and our hope.  To express that so well on that night will be remembered.  It was truly a God-event for many.  Tears were shed and hearts were touched.
     For me, I had the best seat in the house for the event.  I was in a tower, high above the ball field.  As an organizer, I also knew how things came together.  That itself was the hand of God.  A six inch snowfall days before made for beautiful angels.  The timing of the participants walking in lines across the frozen outfield could not have been better planned.  Everyone was in place with 10 seconds to spare.  The 8 o’clock bell rang, a shout of one, two, three rang across the tundra, and hundreds of angels fell to the earth to flap their wings in support of a fellow family member and friend.  From the tower, it was just like a movie.  Hundreds of colorful angels marching across the snowy white field to land for a moment, before flying in unison while looking into the sky. 
     I have to believe Andy looked down and smiled because we looked up and smiled.  It is not so hard to believe that heaven and earth can be united.  It happened on a snowy field in Ohio.  That day, the hand of God looked like snow angel wings.

Fr. Mark


Evil Happens…We Do Nothing?

Abortion is an issue that I don’t relish focusing attention on or talking about, especially at Christmas time. The death of unborn children, as we consider Christ in Mary’s womb in anticipation of His birth, seems so incredibly wrong. And yet, with the opening of the new abortion clinic in Lima, it seems essential that something be said.

There are several points that are usually raised when someone mentions abortion as an option: it should be a woman’s right to choose; we’re supporting women; it’s only a blob of tissue, nothing has changed in the fight against abortion after so many years. Let’s take a few minutes to address these issues.

For any consideration of abortion, we need to understand what the action really is. Abortion is the ending of a pregnancy by removing the child growing within its mother. It isn’t a blob of tissue, but a human being. All of the genetic information is present for the child’s physical development. Equally present is a soul, that gift from God that makes us unique from simply being animals.

The child in the womb has been described as a blob, something less than human, so that an abortion might seem okay. Yet the truth is that the child looks very human after only a few weeks of growth, but has been fully human since conception when body and soul come together.

I think some of these false ideas have surfaced when people witnessed the destruction of a human being after the suction machine has torn it apart, much like we don’t recognize the animal in hamburger. In addition, it can only be without faith that we see the developing child as a blob since we are denying the soul’s presence.

With the recognition that this is truly a child, a human being, let’s look particularly at ‘a woman’s right to choose.’ What is she choosing? She is choosing to end the life of her child. Again it appears obvious that we do not see the child as a child for no one is in favor of killing another. We do not have the option to choose to kill other people. We couldn’t kill the child in a mother’s womb unless, in our minds, we make that child less than human.

The other piece that I grapple with is why anyone sees abortion as something helpful to women. The procedures are anything but affirming. For example, a woman who is less than 9 ½ weeks pregnant and has a medical abortion (which is the method at the Lima facility) will be given an oral medication (RU-486) in the office and will be sent home with medication that needs to be vaginally inserted 6-72 hours after that oral medication. Then alone in her home, she will begin cramping and bleeding until the child is discharged. She is left alone to flush her child away.

How is any of that positive for a woman? Did she really know what her choice was? Was she forced to endure this by someone else, economics, or shame? If we truly want to support women, we need to help them with the natural, yet challenging situation of their pregnancy. We need to be there offering support, education, supplies and advice, much like Heartbeat and other Pregnancy Centers.

Adding to the trauma of this crime against women and children is how it tears at families. I have heard the weeping grandmother sharing the story of her lost first-grandchild and the sorrow of a young father who was given no option at all about the life of his child. And then there is the regret of the post-abortive woman, whose sadness seems unquenchable.

Things have changed over the years in support of life. There have been laws put in place that would prosecute anyone who forces a woman to have an abortion. The Hyde Amendment prevents federal money from being spent on abortion. The Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act prevents the abortion of a child shortly before its birth.

Why hasn’t more been done? Perhaps the answer is you. What have you done to fight against this evil? Has it been a focus of daily prayer? Did you join members of St. Michael’s Parish in being a prayerful witness outside of the Center for Choice abortion clinic during 40 Days for Life? Do you write letters to the editor about this issue? Have you called or e-mailed your Congressman?

As Edmund Burke once said, “All it takes for evil to triumph is for good people to do nothing.” It happened during Christ’s life and it is happening during ours.

Jan Kahle, Pro-Life Coordinator for the Diocese of Toledo


Oh, Eliza, Little Liza Jane

(Written on Wednesday, Nov. 17)

Hi to all you bloggers,

     I’m all excited about tonight’s activities for our teenagers:  square dancing.  I love to square dance.  I grew up with it as part of family weddings and physical education in school.  I also square-danced when I used to have a date or two (boy, has that been a while).  I still call them for different functions, and now we have this activity as part of our religious education program.

    You may ask, “How is square dancing related to religious education?”  First of all, my cousin, Fr. Mel Lochtefeld, taught square dancing years ago.  Much of our faith comes from tradition.  I’m just continuing the tradition.

     Next, our students are studying the Theology of the Body.  So much is made of what is inappropriate.  We thought of a way to teach what is appropriate.  Just because you dance with someone of the opposite sex doesn’t mean that you are dating them. 

    My nieces and nephews have been square dancing with each other at weddings for years.  They’ve been dancing since they’ve been in grade school. To be able to hold hands with boundaries and a purpose is a good thing.  So much of what we teach in regards to the physical person is taught in response to fear or suspicion.  Dancing gives an outlet for good fun and social appropriateness.  

     The Church says, in John Paul’s writings on The Theology of the Body, that the physical aspect of man is good.  I believe that our square dancing lessons will bring out the good in our students and respect for the physical person. 

     If you’ve ever seen our students in sports, you know how physical they can be.  Tonight, they can see how they can work together to dance with the stars.  We need a name for our class.  “Dancing with the Stars” is taken.  Maybe someone can come up with a good name.    

     I’m off to practice my Li’l Liza Jane.            

     Fr. Mark


You’re Such a Snob!

A friendly hello, with a smile.  That’s all it takes to brighten my day.  It’s a simple gesture with a powerful effect.  How many times do we walk by others during the day and fail to say hello?  We know the person walking by us, or maybe we don’t, but we put our head down or act like we’re busy doing something else.  

We’re all guilty of it, but why? 

When someone greets me by name, it’s the best!  When I walk into church and someone holds the door and says “Good Morning,” my day just got better.  I love those little moments of genuine goodness. 

What stops us from saying hello?  Maybe we’re afraid they won’t say hello back.  Maybe we think we’re not good enough or they don’t want to be bothered. Maybe we’re just having a bad day and don’t feel like talking.  These aren’t good excuses. 

The people we encounter don’t know WHY we’re not saying hello.  We’re just coming across as snobbish.  And who likes a snob?

So, here’s the challenge…say hello to everyone you meet today.  And if someone says hello to you, don’t respond as if it pains you.  Smile and call them by name if you can.  Don’t be selective with your friendliness…share it with EVERYONE!

Spread a little love….a little hello.  It says you care.  It feels good. 

You up for it?


Embrace the Person You Could Be

     How many times have you heard someone say, “I am what I am, too bad if you don’t like it.”  Challenges come every day, be they small, large or life-changing.  We can embrace those challenges or we can run from them. 

     Everything you experience today helps you become the person you will be tomorrow and helps you grow into the person you were meant to be. Personal growth, the hard way, comes to us through those life-changing situations.  We can take life as it comes and not really spend any time thinking that we need to grow or we can embrace the change, knowing it may not be easy, but we’ll never be the same. 

     Sometimes we can see where others need to grow, but never really think we need to grow.  What is the Bible verse about getting the log out of your own eye? “Why do you notice the splinter in your brother’s eye, but do not perceive the wooden beam in your own eye?” Matthew 7:3. 

     Everything we experience helps us minister to others.  I have come to know that all our experiences make us who we are, so we can help minister to God’s people.  Happy or sad experiences, all of them, help us grow into who we were destined to become and help us relate to others…God’s plan for us. 

     What a great gift from God that is – to have our experiences and then that, in turn, helps us to “love one another” better.  Love is what it’s all about. Love is the bottom line.  Take some time and let those you love know it.  Thank those who have mentored you and find others who need love and share it. 

     When faced with a decision, always error on the side of love. Prioritize your lives and see what you can get rid of so you can love and have the time for what is important.  Who are you called to be?

– Connie


God is Love? But What’s Love?

            We often hear the statement that “God is love.” It appears in Scripture and in descriptions of God, and rightly so, for God truly is love; however, that idea does very little to help us understand God. I mean, we all appreciate the concept of love; but we usually associate love with a feeling of peace and contentment, happiness and joy. In reality, those are the after effects of love. Those are the feelings we receive from love. They are not love, itself.

            So what is love? Fortunately, St. Paul spoke to the Corinthians about love. He named love’s characteristics. He helped them, and us, to recognize love as it appears in the world. He shared the truth about love in 1 Corinthians 13:4-7

“Love is patient, love is kind. It is not jealous, (love) is not pompous, it is not inflated, it is not rude, it does not seek its own interests, it is not quick-tempered, it does not brood over injury, it does not rejoice over wrongdoing but rejoices with the truth. It bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.”

            Now we can look at the individual characteristics of love. We can see the truth about love – patience, kindness, no jealousy, no arrogance, no exaggeration, no rudeness, no self-centeredness, slow to anger, no brooding, no happiness about wrongs, happiness in truth, tolerant, faith-filled, hopeful, enduring. Those are things we can look for and recognize. Those are traits we can emulate. Those are the things we appreciate in others.

            When we focus on the characteristics of love to understand our God, we have a clearer picture of Him:

  • He is patient. He would never force Himself into our lives, but waits for our invitation.
  • He is kind, so no mean thing comes from Him. His plan was not to have illness, disasters, pain, or death. His plan was and still is paradise for all of us.
  • He is not jealous. He wants the best for us.
  • He is not arrogant. After all He is God, He could be demanding of our choice and behavior, but He is not.
  • He is truth. Even if the information is challenging, He shares what He knows we need.
  • He is not rude. He does not want us to fail or to be hurt or to be less than all we can be.
  • He is not self-centered. His desire is for our happiness.
  • He is slow to anger. Just imagine the number of times we would have done away with humankind if we were in charge.

The litany could go on and on.

            If we understand God in this light and if we choose to be more like our Father, we have a real path to follow. In Jesus, we have a clear picture of God and how to walk that path. We can be love for one another and love our God.

God is love. There is no greater choice than to be more like our Father.

– Jan


Everyone is a Missionary

October 21st is the feast day for St. Gaspar, the founder of the Missionaries of the Precious Blood.  When I was considering what type of priest I wanted to be, I reflected on going to a foreign land to spread the knowledge of God.  There are different kinds of priests.  Some minister to a local area (diocesan priests) or others have teaching as their focus (Jesuits), but I chose to be a missionaryA missionary doesn’t always mean going to a different country or culture but an attitude of active preaching, living and learning of our faith.  Missionary is just as much learning God from the people you are living with as much as bringing your idea of God to others.
This past week I got to observe God Happenings right in front of me.  During the tornado watch, the kindergarten through 5th grades came to the basement of St. Michael’s Church.  It was a time of confusion and fear.  For some, this was the first time they felt this fear without their parents being at their side.  We gathered together to put ourselves in the Lord’s care as we prayed.  It helped to pray together and be God’s arms for each other as siblings calmed each other or classmates assured each other with a hug.  The kids were being missionary to me as I witnessed care, concern and love overcome fear and doubt.  I was pretty proud of our young ones.
At the soccer games this week, the missionary spirit came forwardWe prayed for a victory and placed the players in the Lord’s hands.  Even though the victory was not won on the field of soccer, I saw students and parents hanging around to console, comfort and encourage the team and coaches.  This strong sense of community is nice to behold.  When this spirit reaches out from a local community to a world community or even a neighboring community, that is being missionary.
Our faith is played out on many fields and locations not necessarily in a church building.  This week I was reminded what it means to be a missionary.  Thanks to everyone who showed the face of God to me this week.
Have a blessed week.  Fr. Mark

What’s the BEST part of Putnam County?

I talked to my travel agent this week to check on a return trip to New Zealand.  It looks like there’s a spot for me in mid-January.  I can’t wait to return.  I’ll be away from Putnam County for ten days.  Ten days goes so fast so I want to do as many fun things as possible.  The country has so much to offer like mountains, beaches, hiking and biking, wineries, cafes and cows.  New Zealand is known for its natural beauty – I may not know where to start. 

But I do know where to start, and that is with all the people I miss.  As a parish priest of small parishes, you get to know people pretty quickly.  I’m not going back just to see one of the world’s most beautiful countries.   The warmth of the people is calling.

This weekend I’ll  canoe with a group of high school seniors from our church.  I had to check out the conditions of the river on Tuesday to make sure everything was good for the kids later in the week.  On the trip down the mighty Blanchard River, we saw lots of birds (including a bald eagle), a raccoon and squirrels, fish jumping into our boat and just the calm of leaves falling from the trees above the river.  We hope to offer the kids a day of beauty and calm away from texting and cell phones. 

Putnam County has a lot to offer.  Some refer to it as God’s Country.

Last weekend, people from all over came back to Kalida for Pioneer Days.  It was a nice weekend, with tons of people coming back to Putnam County for all the best it has to offer.  The parade route was filled, as was the downtown square.  As I drove our church float, it was a nice feeling to see all the people joined on a glorious day. 

People from New Zealand ask me what Putnam County offers.  I could tell them about the eagle on The Blanchard, the rich heritage of the people and its beautiful churches and the flat, productive farmland, but I would rather tell them about what happens at Pioneer Days:  people gathering for friendship.

During Pioneer Days, the offer of a hand of friendship was offered hundreds, maybe thousands of times.  Many times the offer came with the offer of a beer – it seems the German thing to do.  Ever since I was shot when I was eight years old, my stomach can’t do certain foods and beverages.  I can’t do apple juice, Hawaiian punch, Sunkist Orange or beer .  It is easy for me to say no to this offer of liquid hospitality and to be able to tell the difference between the offer of friendship and the offer of a beer. 

It is not just a weak stomach that makes me say no to the beer, either.   I do worry that sometimes our young people can’t distinguish between the offerings.  Somehow beer, hospitality and friendship fused together in this community.  With my stomach injury I said no to the one offer and yes to the other offer quite easily.  But our young people and others who want to avoid alcohol may find it difficult becuase they don’t want to reject the offer of hospitality and friendship. 

In New Zealand the offer of hospitality also included a drink: usually a hot beverage of tea, coffee, milo (hot chocolate) or hot water.  In this German community the welcome comes out, “Want a beer?” Translation:  “It’s good to see you, welcome to our home.”

This area offers so much.  Just like New Zealand, the greatest gift is the gift of its people.  The kindness, hospitality and friendship keep people coming back.  When people from New Zealand ask what the area offers, I tell them to come and meet the people.  They offer the best the world can give.


Living the Sweet Life

It’s Pioneer Days in Kalida and it will be a busy weekend. I’ll be working with the Bingo booth, Duck Races, flipping social burgers, calling square dances and most of all enjoying the food and atmosphere.

When I was young, church festivals and fairs were tough to attend because I did not have money for a lot of extras.  That meant I had to be careful of how I spent my quarters, dimes and pennies(yes, I am old).  I thought to myself of how neat it would be to run away with the circus, so to speak.

I’d be surrounded by cotton candy, taffy and parades all the time.  I think I was secretly called to be a carnival person rather than a priest.  As a young person I was looking for the sweet life, and that meant cotton candy.  My mom always said that too much cotton candy would make my teeth fall out.

Either my mom was telling me stories, I didn’t eat enough to make my teeth fall out or there was a lesson my mom was trying to teach me.  I’m banking on the latter.  Life isn’t always a sweet carnival. There is real food that must be eaten sometime.  Sweets are fine for short intervals but will I really grow without substance?

I believe this lesson goes not only for the body but for the whole person.  To be a whole person there will be things on our plate that might not be the sweetest but may bethe best for us. Sacrifice and hard work are hard to swallow but may help us grow more than selfishness and laziness.

Mom always said our teeth would fall out if we had too many sweets.  Mom made sure our teeth didn’t fall out due to proper eating habits at the table and in life.  I am better for it and smile with my own teeth.

I believe we want a sweet life for our kids and for ourselves.  Jesus came that we might have life and have it to the full.  When I see the kids here I smile and want the best for them.

Today, I don’t think they have to run away to the circus to be filled with sweet things.  The circus is here. As a nation and a community we have been blessed with many sweet things.  The challenge for parents and our community is to help the kids keep their teeth and to smile because they have a full life.

And yes, I will have some cotton candy this weekend.  I’ll also work the booths to keep our community strong.

In the spirit of Pioneer, what are you most looking forward to in this weekend’s festivities?


Why Can’t I Have Sex Before Marriage?

           The question about having sex before Marriage is an important one to grasp. It hints at something more than a common, usual experience. It alludes to something desirous that needs to be treated in a special way. Thus it is imperative to understand the act of sex and how it can manifest love.

            The union of man and woman during sexual intercourse is a unique gift of giving and a clear role in the action of creation. The sanctity of sex is reflected in the ultimate communion of two people, the complete giving and receiving of one for another. In addition, that union may be further mirrored in a new human life. The act of sex brings man and woman together as one. It continues the story of creation. It must be an action of love.

            For this reason, we can not treat sex as a casual, earthly event. When we recognize the sacred nature of this union, we must surround it with the reverence and appreciation that it deserves. The Church looks to Christ to understand the complete giving of self for another and how to embrace full communion.

            When we consider how Christ became a man, suffered, died and rose for us, we have the truth about love. He is what love looks like. His witness shows that love is given totally, freely, faithfully, and fruitfully. He gave Himself without holding anything back. He did so freely, not forced. He remained faithful to us throughout his entire life on earth and continues to be with us in the Eucharist. The fruits of His action of love are mercy and the opening of Heaven.

            By using this lens to look at having sex before Marriage, we can see the shortcomings of that action. Pre-marital sex is not a total and faithful giving of oneself because it lacks a complete commitment, no witnessed pledge or vow. Pre-marital sex is not often given freely, but rather coerced as a ‘show of love’ or ‘just something that two people do next.’ Pre-marital sex does not strengthen the family unit that children need.

            With this truth of Christ before us, we see why sex is an action of love between husband and wife. Through the Sacrament of Marriage they have answered the questions that most identify a loving relationship:

  1. “Have you come here freely to give yourself to one another without reservation?”
  2. “Do you promise to be faithful until death?”
  3. “Do you promise to receive children lovingly from God?”

Their vows to one another are a witness to us that they desire to love one another as Christ loves his Church – TOTALLY, FREELY, FAITHFULLY, FRUITFULLY – and every time they unite in sex, it is a renewal of those vows.

–Jan


2 Women in Toledo Choose Life

Jan Kahle received the following email last week from Ann Barrick, of the Pro Life Connection, about two girls who chose life after contemplating abortion (when approached at the Center for Choice, in Toledo, OH).  Jan wanted as many people as possible to hear this story:

PRAISE GOD!!  Two women chose life for their babies this evening!!  I thought you might like to hear the stories…  Enjoy!

A young couple passed by a sidewalk counselor as they went into the abortion center.  The man took the information that the counselor offered but didn’t stop to talk, just looked at her strangely.  Five minutes later, he walked out of the center right to her and stood there.  She asked him if he wanted to talk.  He said, “I just can’t stay inside that place!  It’s so depressing!”  The counselor talked to the man for awhile, and he kept trying to justify the abortion.  Meanwhile, 3 teens, 1 pre-teen and a woman was praying on the sidewalk in front while another counselor was across the alley praying.  God touched the man’s heart at some point in the conversation because he softened and eventually listened to the advice, “Go fight for your baby!”  He said, “I’m going to go talk to her!”

Not much later, a girl and her mother came out and walked over to get rosaries from the counselor.  They were there to schedule an abortion but told me that the plan had changed!  The mother of the girl was in the room when the ultrasound was done, and when she saw on the screen her grandchild move, she said, “You’re not aborting my grandbaby!”  Her daughter is 7 months along!!   And that baby could be aborted!!  Thanks be to God that the grandmother saw that ultrasound!!

As the girl was showing the ultrasound photo to the counselor, the young man mentioned earlier walked by so the counselor asked him to come look at the photo.  After a few minutes of looking and talking, he told the counselor, “Go talk to her!”   His girlfriend came over and talked to the counselor and told her that she wasn’t going to have an abortion.  She said that her boyfriend had changed his mind after talking to the counselor and that helped her because she had seen “the children praying” and that made her not want to go through with it!!

PRAYER AND WITNESS!!  The girl who’s mother saw the ultrasound—she was the recipient of prayers even if she never talked to anyone!!  The same with the young woman—and the presence of those young people touched a chord.  It is SO important that we never forget the power of prayer and witness!!

I also want to put a plug in for Heartbeat Pregnancy Center which is located across the alley from the Center for Choice.  They, along with all pregnancy centers, are crucial in the pro-life movement.  However, they particularly need our help since they ARE located near the abortion center!  They need financial help to get an ultrasound machine and all the expenses that  go along with it.  Can you imagine if they had that and we could just walk someone over for an ultrasound?!?  They also need more volunteers so they can be open longer hours, especially on Thursday evenings.  Please let others know how important our local pregnancy centers are!!

Remember—40 Days for Life is coming and we need you prayer warriors!  However, we are praying at the center year round.  Visit the Stand & Pray page at ProLifeConnection.com for more information!

In Christ our Hope,

Ann


You’re wearing THAT to church?

What to wear, what to wear?  Things sure were more simple years ago when we had three options: school clothes, work clothes and, what we in the Hoying family called, “Sunday, go to meeting clothes”, the best outfit in the closet.  

What to wear in New Zealand was easier also as nearly every school had uniforms.  From Monday through Friday the same outfit was worn.  But now, it’s the weekend and what do you wear to church?  There’s always something to do right after church, like a ballgame, a neighborhood gathering, a movie or other social events.  And if you are like me, you hate to keep changing clothes.  And it’s Summer.  How much clothes do I have to wear to be considered dignified for church?  

What to wear, what to wear? Even in workplaces, fashion has changed.  Wearing of a tie and business suit is rare.  What is the proper fashion for a church setting?  When considering an outfit I always try to consider that going to church is a community gathering to give praise to God.

If my outfit distracts from the worship, I’m probably wearing the wrong clothes.  If I were to wear a skirt to church in Fiji or Samoa it would not distract from worship. If I wore a skirt here, all the women would be jealous of my legs, and the prayer would be distracted (ha ha).  Sometimes clothing or lack of clothing needs to be considered when determining what to wear to church.  God will hear my prayers no matter what I wear, but if my outfit prevents others from praying, I’m probably not looking out for my neighbor as well as I should.


How Prayer led Fr. Mark to the Priesthood

When people ask me how I knew that I wanted to be a priest, I tell them that it was in me.  That feeling has been in me for a while.  Believe me, to give up farming, a wife and kids and a permanent home were hard decisions to make.  I took lots of time to answer these questions with the help of deep prayer.  There were many times I asked God if He was sure because I surely wasn’t that certain.  But when I came down to looking at what was in me, priesthood still came out
When I needed that time to pray deeply, just God and me, I would go to a special place.  At the back of the farm was a corner of property which was not farmed because of a crossing creek.  Small trees, brush, rabbits, deer and lots of song birds were my companions in prayer.  I’d take time out to sit and listen to what was in me and see what was true.  If truth was to set me free, I’d have to listen to God, the Truth.  I’d spend time to see what I could live with or without.  I knew God wished me to live life to the fullest, I just had to figure that out and how I would do that.  As the idea of priesthood kept coming to mind I figured I better give it a shot.  It was only through time in prayer that I could say that it was in me. 
One other reflection was that the tractor was always a special place to pray until something happened-we got a radio on the tractor.  I loved music and would sing loud enough to hear me over the diesel engine and for the neighbors to hear me.  My question for especially the young bloggers is, where do you find your quiet place?  How do you know what is in you so that you can live life to the fullest?  With so many music opportunities out there, and distractions to quiet, where do you pray best? 

Top 5 Reasons to Attend Mass

It’s funny how our attendance at Mass has always been associated with the 10 Commandments, particularly to “Keep Holy the Lord’s Day,” when actually it is for our benefit not God’s. With that in mind, here are five motives to go to Church on Sunday:

  1. 1. To feed a spiritual life – We often hear “I can pray better at home or in the mountains or alone.” Prayer at anytime is wonderful and necessary, but prayer at Mass is unique. It is God’s children gathering to share a meal. One form is not ‘better’ than another but ‘as important’ as the other. We need both types of food to nourish us.
  2. 2. To draw on God’s support – Much like any meal, we are strengthened and renewed to continue our work when we have eaten. If we dine on a meal of foul language and rude behavior, much like junk food, it will have its effect. If we enjoy a meal of God’s Word and the Body & Blood of Christ, it also will have its effect. In the case of Sunday Mass, we are gathering the nourishment we need for eternal life.
  3. To develop community – Just like any family gathering, we need to come together to strengthen our bonds and ties to one another. Just consider how much closer you are to brothers, sisters, or parents whom you see more regularly, as opposed to cousins and grandparents that you might not. 
  4. To strengthen one another – The whole reason for strengthening our bonds and ties through our gathering for Sunday Mass is to be able to support one another. How would I know you without gathering with you? And how can I reach out to you if I don’t know you? We are the physical presence of God in this world, so it’s important to be with one another to do His work.
  5. To worship God – When it comes right down to it, we are built for LOVE. We have an interior desire and pull toward God, who is Love. We often try to fill that desire with things or activities, but we always come away wanting more – that intangible something.  St. Augustine said it best, “Our hearts are restless until they rest in You.”

Why should we go to Church on Sunday? For very selfish reasons, to bring about our own peace and joy. God knows that. He even made it a commandment for our sake.

What are your personal reasons for attending mass? Please share them in the comments below.