Catholic Community Commentary

Posts tagged “love

Jesus Came to Divide Us?

            At a recent children’s Mass that I attended, the Gospel reading for the day was from Luke 12:49-53 where Jesus says, “Do you think that I have come to establish peace on the earth?  No, I tell you, but rather division.” Christ continued to explain that father would be against son, mother against daughter, mother-in-law against daughter-in-law and so on.

            After the reading, the priest spoke to the children and said, “That doesn’t sound like Jesus. In the Gospel, he said one person would be against another person even in families; but Jesus came to unify people not to divide them. He wouldn’t want us to be against each other.”

            Then the priest explained that what Jesus was talking about was how sometimes we disagree about Jesus and what he wants of us. The priest gave the example of going to Mass, when some family members do not want to go. He said, “You know, boys and girls, sometimes Moms and Dads don’t want to go to Mass on Sunday. You might tell them, ‘but we’re Catholic, we have to go to Mass on Sunday’ and they might say, ‘well we are sleeping in, we are not going.’ That’s the division that Jesus was talking about.”

            I was so struck by what this priest had to say. The division and conflict in the Catholic Church does not come from outside sources. It doesn’t even come from high ranking officials. The unrest and lack of peace in the Church comes from within each one of us, especially in our families.

            When we turn away from what Jesus has taught, we experience an unsettled hunger. Our peace is gone. By embracing the teachings of Christ, we are fostering a peace with deep roots of comfort for ourselves. It is truly our free-will gift to choose –away from Jesus and sorrow or toward Jesus and joy.

Jan Kahle

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Komen…What’s the Controversy?

            Recently Bishop Blair wrote a letter concerning fund-raising for the Susan G. Komen Foundation. His clear statement addressed the problem of cancer research and the use of embryonic stem cells. While Susan G. Komen ofNorthwest Ohiodoes not directly fund cancer research, it does send 25% of the collected donations to the parent company which does offer grants for cancer research.

          Bishop Blair is responsible for imparting the teaching of the Catholic Faith to the people ofNorthwest Ohio. It is a responsibility that he neither takes lightly nor can choose to ignore. In that capacity, the Bishop addressed the sanctity of human life from conception to natural death, one of those teachings. Since some cancer research institutions use unwanted embryos from fertility centers for their research, there is potential that these small human lives are not being respected.

          In addition to support of life in the womb, Bishop Blair also offered support for those struggling with cancer when he suggested directing donations to the Mercy Cancer Centers. The Northwest Ohio Susan G. Komen Foundation had been sending money to the Mercy Cancer Centers as part of their outreach so the Bishop’s suggestion does not diminish this work.

          It is very important for us to realize that any past fund-raising we may have done for the Susan G. Komen Foundation, done in good faith, was not wrong. However, knowing what we do now, it is important to direct our donations to life-affirming organizations.

          Finally, since embryonic stem cells have been used in research, they have never been proven to assist with any medical condition. In fact, they react much like cancer cells. On the other hand, adult stem cells, which harm no human being, have been proven to help with leukemia, Parkinson’s disease, spinal cord injury, juvenile diabetes, lupus, multiple sclerosis, sickle-cell anemia, heart damage, corneal damage, and dozens of other conditions. Just from a scientific perspective, it does not make sense to direct funds to research that has proven itself ineffective and away from such a viable alternative.

          I would hope, though, that we would approach this issue through the eyes of faith. I pray that as Catholics we can see that when we treat any human being, no matter how small or vulnerable, as less than dignified, we tear at the very fabric of our own humanity, our connection to the Creator.

Jan Kahle, Respect Life Coordinator for the Diocese of Toledo


The Hand of God and Snow Angels

Hi to you bloggers,
     I’ve been away for a while due to vacation and Christmas activities.  It is good to be back.  Today’s topic is seeing the hand of God. 
     Recently, our parish put together something unusual and touching.  We decided to put together a project called “Andy’s Angels in the Outfield.”  An invitation was put out to get participants to line up on a lighted baseball field and to fall backwards into the snow (in zero degree weather) to make snow angels for a recently departed angel named Andy.  Our expectations of a few angels showing up were soon overwhelmed as hundreds of angels showed up for the fundraising event to help the family with expenses due to Andy’s illness.  Although we raised a nice financial nest egg, we raised the spirits of the family and community. 
     To say that we will never forget, and that love will never die, is part of our faith and our hope.  To express that so well on that night will be remembered.  It was truly a God-event for many.  Tears were shed and hearts were touched.
     For me, I had the best seat in the house for the event.  I was in a tower, high above the ball field.  As an organizer, I also knew how things came together.  That itself was the hand of God.  A six inch snowfall days before made for beautiful angels.  The timing of the participants walking in lines across the frozen outfield could not have been better planned.  Everyone was in place with 10 seconds to spare.  The 8 o’clock bell rang, a shout of one, two, three rang across the tundra, and hundreds of angels fell to the earth to flap their wings in support of a fellow family member and friend.  From the tower, it was just like a movie.  Hundreds of colorful angels marching across the snowy white field to land for a moment, before flying in unison while looking into the sky. 
     I have to believe Andy looked down and smiled because we looked up and smiled.  It is not so hard to believe that heaven and earth can be united.  It happened on a snowy field in Ohio.  That day, the hand of God looked like snow angel wings.

Fr. Mark


Have a Song in Your Hearts this Christmas

Merry Christmas. 

     When it comes to Christmas, I have my favorite songs.  Music always brings me places. 

The “Barking Dogs Jingle Bells” makes me like Happy Gilmore.  I find a happy place. 

The “Carol of the Bells” takes me to a reflective quiet place. 

“Mary Did You Know?” makes me gentle. 

Any Karen Carpenter song makes me a member of a choir, as I love to sing with her. 

“Some Children See Him” makes me an advocate for world unity and peace. 

“I Wonder as I Wonder” makes me extra holy, as I wonder at the plans that God worked through a child, a son, a Messiah.  I wonder how God will touch my life as I begin a new year. 

“The Friendly Beasts” brings me back to a time when I was a farmer and my dad would invite us kids to treat the animals particularly well on Christmas because Jesus came to change all creation.

     Christmas songs move me.  And I truly believe that Christmas is supposed to move us also.  If a song can take us places, how much more can the One, who makes Christmas what it is, take us places we never imagined?  To have a song in one’s heart is one thing.  To have Jesus there is quite another story.  To know we are so loved, through the birth of God’s Son, makes traveling through this world to the next a journey of love.  Love moves us to do amazing things.  Let Christmas move you.  Let the Lord move you, for love is born on Christmas Day.  

   Merry Christmas to all of you.  Have a song in your hearts.  Have the love of God, Jesus, there also, today and every day.       

     I’ll be home for Christmas.  Not because of my traveling, but because He has made His home in me.                                          

Fr. Mark


Oh, Eliza, Little Liza Jane

(Written on Wednesday, Nov. 17)

Hi to all you bloggers,

     I’m all excited about tonight’s activities for our teenagers:  square dancing.  I love to square dance.  I grew up with it as part of family weddings and physical education in school.  I also square-danced when I used to have a date or two (boy, has that been a while).  I still call them for different functions, and now we have this activity as part of our religious education program.

    You may ask, “How is square dancing related to religious education?”  First of all, my cousin, Fr. Mel Lochtefeld, taught square dancing years ago.  Much of our faith comes from tradition.  I’m just continuing the tradition.

     Next, our students are studying the Theology of the Body.  So much is made of what is inappropriate.  We thought of a way to teach what is appropriate.  Just because you dance with someone of the opposite sex doesn’t mean that you are dating them. 

    My nieces and nephews have been square dancing with each other at weddings for years.  They’ve been dancing since they’ve been in grade school. To be able to hold hands with boundaries and a purpose is a good thing.  So much of what we teach in regards to the physical person is taught in response to fear or suspicion.  Dancing gives an outlet for good fun and social appropriateness.  

     The Church says, in John Paul’s writings on The Theology of the Body, that the physical aspect of man is good.  I believe that our square dancing lessons will bring out the good in our students and respect for the physical person. 

     If you’ve ever seen our students in sports, you know how physical they can be.  Tonight, they can see how they can work together to dance with the stars.  We need a name for our class.  “Dancing with the Stars” is taken.  Maybe someone can come up with a good name.    

     I’m off to practice my Li’l Liza Jane.            

     Fr. Mark


You’re Such a Snob!

A friendly hello, with a smile.  That’s all it takes to brighten my day.  It’s a simple gesture with a powerful effect.  How many times do we walk by others during the day and fail to say hello?  We know the person walking by us, or maybe we don’t, but we put our head down or act like we’re busy doing something else.  

We’re all guilty of it, but why? 

When someone greets me by name, it’s the best!  When I walk into church and someone holds the door and says “Good Morning,” my day just got better.  I love those little moments of genuine goodness. 

What stops us from saying hello?  Maybe we’re afraid they won’t say hello back.  Maybe we think we’re not good enough or they don’t want to be bothered. Maybe we’re just having a bad day and don’t feel like talking.  These aren’t good excuses. 

The people we encounter don’t know WHY we’re not saying hello.  We’re just coming across as snobbish.  And who likes a snob?

So, here’s the challenge…say hello to everyone you meet today.  And if someone says hello to you, don’t respond as if it pains you.  Smile and call them by name if you can.  Don’t be selective with your friendliness…share it with EVERYONE!

Spread a little love….a little hello.  It says you care.  It feels good. 

You up for it?


Embrace the Person You Could Be

     How many times have you heard someone say, “I am what I am, too bad if you don’t like it.”  Challenges come every day, be they small, large or life-changing.  We can embrace those challenges or we can run from them. 

     Everything you experience today helps you become the person you will be tomorrow and helps you grow into the person you were meant to be. Personal growth, the hard way, comes to us through those life-changing situations.  We can take life as it comes and not really spend any time thinking that we need to grow or we can embrace the change, knowing it may not be easy, but we’ll never be the same. 

     Sometimes we can see where others need to grow, but never really think we need to grow.  What is the Bible verse about getting the log out of your own eye? “Why do you notice the splinter in your brother’s eye, but do not perceive the wooden beam in your own eye?” Matthew 7:3. 

     Everything we experience helps us minister to others.  I have come to know that all our experiences make us who we are, so we can help minister to God’s people.  Happy or sad experiences, all of them, help us grow into who we were destined to become and help us relate to others…God’s plan for us. 

     What a great gift from God that is – to have our experiences and then that, in turn, helps us to “love one another” better.  Love is what it’s all about. Love is the bottom line.  Take some time and let those you love know it.  Thank those who have mentored you and find others who need love and share it. 

     When faced with a decision, always error on the side of love. Prioritize your lives and see what you can get rid of so you can love and have the time for what is important.  Who are you called to be?

– Connie