Catholic Community Commentary

Mass

Jesus, the Eucharist

            A while ago I heard an elderly person struggling with issues of old age say that in his life Jesus endured every kind of human suffering except old age. I thought how true, he was only 33 years old when he died. He could not have faced any challenges that we might experience as we grow older. However, I recently realized how wrong that statement was.

            Consider Jesus today. It is really, truly Jesus in the Sacrament of the Eucharist – body, soul and divinity. All that was Jesus during his 33 years of life on Earth is all present as the Eucharist. Certainly for us as humans, the visual presence of Jesus has changed, but that does nothing to alter the fact that it is the same Jesus. With that in mind consider what he continues to endure in his “old age”.

            Like a person confined to home or a health facility, Jesus waits for his brothers and sisters to come visit him, he can not go out to them without help. He sees that some come willingly, anxious to be with him. He sees those who come grudgingly, inattentive, sharing nothing with him. He sees those who are distracted, focused on something else. He sees those who smile and those who scowl. He witnesses the closeness of some and the distance of others. Perhaps most of all, he is painfully aware of those who did not come at all. Jesus knows exactly what it is like to be immobile and unable to communicate.

            With that in mind, how are we responding to Jesus in his “old age”? Do we come willingly and openly to Mass? Do we participate and include everyone? Do we make time to share an extra visit with Jesus in addition to Sunday Mass? Do we take advantage of Eucharistic Adoration to gaze on him? Are we aware of his look of love toward us?

            Sometimes our worship as Catholics is picked apart because it is different from other religious denominations. It needs to be different. It can not be the same as a social gathering – the King of the Universe is in our midst. We can not receive the host without reverence – we hold the Savior of the World. The reverence of the priest and the people is the only way we have to outwardly communicate that Catholic worship is different because present physically in our gathering is God.

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Mass-a comfort zone?

Hi to all you bloggers.  After a week off, I’m ready to get back in the saddle.  Last week, I kind of bucked and kicked a bit, but now I’m settled in again.  After a tough week, sometimes it is nice to settle back into something comfortable and familiar, even on a spiritual nature.

For many people, the Sunday Mass is a comfort from life’s adventurous ride. The familiar prayers with familiar people praising a familiar God brings peace to the close of a hectic week, and begins the new week with the hope of promised blessings.

I love the Mass.  Even though I get scared every time I have to preach,I enjoy the blessings of the Lord with great people.  Even in a big church like St. Michael’s I see everyone and everything.  I pray for families who have shared stories of life and death with me.  I pray for parents with little ones who make it hard to pray.  I pray with joy as I see newlyweds returning from honeymoons.  Sometimes it is hard to pray because I’ve had a tough week, weekend or night, but the opportunity to celebrate Godly moments and God’s love with so many keeps me coming back.

In October, I will be talking about the Mass during the sermon time.  I know that many people have questions about the Mass.  If you could get those to me before I do my talks, I will try to answer some of them within the talks. It’s nice to be back in the saddle again.


You’re wearing THAT to church?

What to wear, what to wear?  Things sure were more simple years ago when we had three options: school clothes, work clothes and, what we in the Hoying family called, “Sunday, go to meeting clothes”, the best outfit in the closet.  

What to wear in New Zealand was easier also as nearly every school had uniforms.  From Monday through Friday the same outfit was worn.  But now, it’s the weekend and what do you wear to church?  There’s always something to do right after church, like a ballgame, a neighborhood gathering, a movie or other social events.  And if you are like me, you hate to keep changing clothes.  And it’s Summer.  How much clothes do I have to wear to be considered dignified for church?  

What to wear, what to wear? Even in workplaces, fashion has changed.  Wearing of a tie and business suit is rare.  What is the proper fashion for a church setting?  When considering an outfit I always try to consider that going to church is a community gathering to give praise to God.

If my outfit distracts from the worship, I’m probably wearing the wrong clothes.  If I were to wear a skirt to church in Fiji or Samoa it would not distract from worship. If I wore a skirt here, all the women would be jealous of my legs, and the prayer would be distracted (ha ha).  Sometimes clothing or lack of clothing needs to be considered when determining what to wear to church.  God will hear my prayers no matter what I wear, but if my outfit prevents others from praying, I’m probably not looking out for my neighbor as well as I should.